14th July ’21

Peter Britton – Project Proposals for Major Project

Idea One:

The Sun Ablaze or The Sun of a New Day

Test images

Entitled either ‘The Sun Ablaze’ or ‘The Sun of a New Day’ this is a visual, photographic and artistic interpretation of National Trust locations across Wales. Overall, the project will be about the diversity of the Welsh landscape (place), the history of each of the NT sites (memory), topographic variety, and the range of different plant specimens across Wales.

Using the camera-less photographic process of Cyanotype, combined with poured acrylic art I would like to produce a piece of art for each of the 50+ National Trust venues across Wales. You can see my initial experiments here, and get a feel for how the finished pieces will appear:

https://www.peter-britton.com/sense-of-place

The objects/items I would use for this project would come from the National Trust venues, so would therefore involve me collecting and taking leaves, flowers, soil samples, water, etc, and creating the pieces in the landscape.

The final pieces would feature manipulated folds in the paper to incorporate topographical features of the environment. My main inspiration for this comes from my previous project (S A N D), and the engagement I had with Meghann Riepenhoff’s work.

Littoral Drift #93 (Shine Tidelands, Port Ludlow, WA 01.02.17, Five Waves During Tidal Drawback); 42×93″

The project would culminate in an exhibition of the final pieces at one of National Trusts prestigious locations, with potential for a wider exhibition, hopefully in the Senedd in Cardiff Bay where I have exhibited several times previously and have strong links. There could also be potential for a (National Trust?) photobook linked to this project, within which the project narrative is revealed and the artworks are showcased with a description/story of the venue/process description on the facing page.

Research so far: Meghann Riepenhoff, Susan Derges, Adam Jeppesen, Josef Nadj, Andy Goldsworthy.

Idea Two:

H E A D / S P A C E

Misty, 2005, Alec Soth                                                                              On The Beach, 2007, Richard Misrach

This project is an investigation into individuals that use a natural landscape for exercise and escape. I aim to photograph people who use a particular natural landscape (their favourite place) for the benefits of wellbeing. It is about the benefits that are given by a landscape whilst undertaking their exercise pursuits; utilising the natural environment for exercise and wellbeing purposes. This brings my previous projects into sharp perspective as all of the themes that I have been working towards are realised via this project – place, memory and wellbeing. This project however steps away from ‘me’, and opens up challenges and difficulties as I attempt to uncover these themes within other people. Visually, I aim to photograph via large format 10×8 colour head and shoulder portraits to show the subject in the environment and aerial drone photography to show the smallness of the subject within the environment. This creates a visual juxtaposition of old (large format film) and new (drone). I want to photograph at least twelve individuals within this project, including a mountain biker, surfer, river kayaker, wild swimmer, rock climber, etc…

There will be an accompanying video piece that looks in depth (via interviews) at three of these characters to further explore their reasons for pursuing activity in a natural landscape.

I see this project culminating in an exhibition, with large format prints of all participants, lit and suspended from stands, alongside their aerial landscape image. The video piece would be part of the installation. There would also be an accompanying book.

Research so far:

Richard Misrach – On The Beach

Markus Torgeby – under the open skies

Alec Soth – MAIN INFLUENCE

Jonathan Bielaski

Madeline Waller – east London swimmers

John Mayers

Martin Schoeller – big heads

August Sander

Jeff Wall (portraits)

Rineke Dijkstra

Dana Lixenburg

Idea Three:

Ghostships and Tides

Peter Britton, Boiler, 2021

I have always been fascinated by Tusker Rock. Sitting in the middle of the Bristol Channel, the 500m rock is only visible at low tide and is a notorious hazard for ships. The aim of this project is to create a legacy for the men and women who lost their lives to the rock.

I recently stumbled upon an article on Wales online about Tusker Rock (https://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/tiny-island-welsh-coast-graveyard-15519672). The Wales online article revealed to me that Tusker Rock is a graveyard for shipwrecked vessels and has ‘killed’ an extraordinary number of people throughout history. I then watched Hidden Wales (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08sfk5l) and by happy circumstance my friend knows Ross Martin very well. As such I organised through him to go out to Tusker Rock on 25th June, and have completed one shoot using large format 5×4, DSLR and Drone Cameras.

Peter Britton, SS Liban, 2021

My intentions are to create a photographic and video art work about the rock, but with the legacy of the lives lost at the projects heart. In Hidden Wales, Ross Martin says “Something should be done to remember the lives of those lost”… I think this is where my project comes in.   

I intend to photograph the rock and the wreck remnants via both film and digital processes (5×4, DSLR and Drone), but to then create installation pieces using gelatine glass cyanotypes. I see this as an exhibition/installation comprised of sea glass cyan abstractions (circular glass layers gelatine cyan printed with the surface of the sea through which the viewer can observe the shipwrecks (drone shots) below), printed large format imagery, a moving image piece and an accompanying sound installation.

On Friday 9th July I was interviewed by the BBC about the project, with a 3 minute segment going out on BBC Wales Today on Wednesday 14th.

Bibliography

Lensculture. 2021. [online] Available at: <https://www.lensculture.com/articles/richard-misrach-on-the-beach&gt; [Accessed 13 July 2021].

Magnum Photos. 2021. Niagara Alec Soth, Magnum Photos Magnum Photos. [online] Available at: <https://www.magnumphotos.com/arts-culture/society-arts-culture/revisiting-alec-soths-niagara/&gt; [Accessed 13 July 2021].

Meghannriepenhoff.com. 2021. Littoral Drift | Meghann Riepenhoff. [online] Available at: <http://meghannriepenhoff.com/project/littoral-drift/&gt; [Accessed 12 July 2021].


15th July ’21

Tusker Rock shoot 25th June

On the 25th June I was fortunate enough to visit Tusker Rock with RNLI crew-members Ross Martin and Frank Benton. I was unsure as to whether this was going to be a recce, a shoot or the start of something big, so I went prepared. I took my 5×4 large format with 24 sheets of film, my DSLR and my drone.

We set off from Porthcawl Harbour at 10am, and the conditions were perfect. We could only access the rock if the seas were calm and the wind low, and these two factors were present on the day. It was a wonderful event. I’ve lived in Porthcawl all my life, but never sailed out of the harbour on a boat. It took about an hour to get to the rock. The traverse is treacherous, as pillars of rock point to the sky from the seafloor, making the passage through the Bristol channel very dangerous. As we moved towards the rock, we were followed by porpoise and we reached the rock at the exact correct time for ease of access. We moved from the yacht to the dingy and rowed ashore.

The experience was amazing. I had the best 1.5 hours with extremely high levels of productivity. Moving between camera formats is always difficult and something that I dislike doing, but in this instance it was successful. I always feel that if you don’t focus on one thing, then something always goes awry… but the shoot was so well planned that these three incredibly different processes worked well as separate methods. The drone was there to capture imagery directly from on top, the slr was to capture general stills and video and the 5×4 was the main capture method to show the wrecks.

Some examples of the 5×4 shots:

The imagery from digital sources and film sources are really successful. Traversing the rock was amazing, as the rock appears to absorbing the wrecks. The wrecks are scattered across the rock, with the SS Liban laying as a skeletal remain on the West side and the Steep Holm gradually breaking down on the East. As it was such a gentle day, the sounds of the small waves lapping at the rocks was tranquil and calming, but I can only imagine what it must be like to be standing on the rock in gale force winds, with roaring waves boiling in the background. To be shipwrecked, at night, at a time when there was no RNLI or rescue service, with the knowledge that once the tide rose the rock that you stood upon would sink into the salty brine must have been horrific. All of that feeling swam upon me as I stood there on that peaceful day amongst the watery graves.

Once I got back on board the yacht I had an overwhelming sense of peace and calm. On the way home we sailed over the wreck of The Mellany. The Mellany, a coal steamer that was travelling from Cardiff to Rio De Janeiro, hit the rock in 1886, foundered and now rests on the channel floor off the coast of Newton dunes.

I feel as though I got everything I needed, but not necessarily everything I wanted from the shoot. I wish to return, to get more drone footage from above and more digital coverage.

Contact sheets:

SLR:

Drone:


16th July ’21

The Lighthouse – film research for Tusker Rock

Well… I watched ‘The Lighthouse’ last night. It was excellent. I enjoy films that have a certain artistic agenda, and this absolutely did. I’m not an enormous fan of the ‘blockbuster’ style of movie making, and I certainly don’t like superhero films, so when I sit down to enjoy a film I do want to be able to take something of worth away.

Dir: Robert Eggers. Starring: Willem Dafoe, Robert Pattinson, and Valeriia Karaman. 15 cert, 109 mins, 2019

Loughrey (2020) says ‘The Lighthouse deals with madness, but in a form that feels ancient and mythical in its nature. Eggers not only draws from the old folk tales and superstitions sailors used to cling to as the only way to bring reason and order to the all-consuming chaos of the sea, but from Greek mythology, too. There are nods to Icarus, Prometheus, and Proteus. Eggers never delineates between reality and dream, leaving us to decide for ourselves whether the island is cursed by some otherworldly power or whether this is all some kind of hallucination. In The Lighthouse, a seagull might just be a seagull, but there’s also a chance it’s a harbinger of evil. Only the sea knows”.

There is a lot that I can draw from this movie. When I create moving video pieces, they do tend to be a little ‘ordinary’. I very much appreciate the visual aesthetic of this film, but more importantly, the sound. The foghorn that permeates the film is extraordinary, and adds such a vast depth of impeding doom. Ghostships and Tides will have an accompanying audio piece, that will now be based around the sound of a fog horn.

Loughrey, C., 2021. The Lighthouse review: A claustrophobic horror filled with sweaty desire, sickly jealousy, and unbridled rage. [online] The Independent. Available at: <https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/lighthouse-review-robert-pattinson-willem-dafoe-trailer-a9143576.html&gt; [Accessed 22 July 2021].


18th July ’21

Research – ship wreck website

https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?151434

This could be a useful resource. It is a website that documents ship wrecks internationally. I’m not currently sure where the project will lead (ie. Stay on Tusker, or move further afield?), but this site could prove useful…

The Liban is on there, but info is scant:

https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?233087


20th July ’21

Application – Arts Council Wales

As a trial for filling in the type of application, I have submitted for funding for ‘Ghostships and Tides’. Via the Arts Council Wales website, I have applied for a £3000 grant… I have done this as an experiment to try the application process and use it as a learning curve. I do not expect to receive funding, but can learn from the experience…

Application notes:

I foresee this as an exhibition. I have previously exhibited in the Welsh Assembly Building (The Senedd), but have wide links to galleries and organisations. I recently had an exhibition in Newport, on Friars Walk in a pop up gallery (https://www.the-sand-dunes.com/the-exhibition) and have access to this space once again. My audience would be all generations and ethnic backgrounds, particularly those with an interest in maritime events, but the project would appeal to many. I would also be holding workshops about the cyanotype procedure and gelatine glass cyanotype procedure for the general public.

This project would link to the RNLI, as they would help facilitate my safe passage to the rock.

The wider impact of having this support would enable the exhibition/workshops to take place. The creation of the circular cyan gelatine pieces is costly. I would attempt to involve the wider community via interviews about the rock, and interview/involve family members of those who lost their lives in the channel. The project by default creates a legacy for the men and women who perished at sea through history.

As the exhibition will hopefully take place in a prominent location in either Newport or Cardiff, the diversity of individuals who have the opportunity to see the project would be incredibly large. I feel it is important for history to be made into art. The lives lost on this rock were diverse; for example the most prominent wreck is the S.S. Liban, a French ship carrying Iron Ore from 1882. I intend to try to find relatives from the wreck and photograph them to show the diversity of industry and interconnectedness.

Knowledge of the danger of the Bristol Channel is little known across the nation, and I intend to show how treacherous this aquatic graveyard is by holding talks and photographic demonstrations. I have strong links to the BAME community in Cardiff, as I am also a photographic lecturer and have created courses in the Wales Millennium Centre (alongside Yusuf Hussein) to help young individuals find a creative path. More of the same could be done within this project. You can read about the course I set up here: https://www.coleggwent.ac.uk/news/a-focus-on-photography-with-ethnic-minority-communities

Art that delves into history unknown is a fascinating thing. To create art about an event, place or moments in eras past allows art to evolve and the past to inspire. Again, I foresee this as an exhibition, and alongside my lecturing links, there is a wealth of opportunity for myself to deliver workshops on the history of the rock/wrecks/legacy and within photographic processes themselves. As an educator, this is a great opportunity to give people that inspirational first step, that could promote a career in the arts.

Cultural contract:

The impact of developing a greater understanding of local maritime disasters could help bring a greater level of understanding about safety in the oceans and the sea. By investigating the past, this project has enormous potential to help with current problems, such as the importance of safety in the waves, safe passage through dangerous sea courses and wider concerns, such as plastic in the oceans.

As a lecturer, there is scope to deliver my own workshops throughout the exhibition, but also to organise guest speakers about these wider issues. I did this recently, with my previous project, and one thing that was was of enormous benefit to the community was a guided tour that I led. I could do the same, on Newton Beach, where I discuss the rock and wider concerns related to the sea. This would be a great opportunity for the wider community to be present, engaged and taking part interactively.

By having the exhibition somewhere prominent, this would also easy access for cultural diversity and expansion of understanding across wider communities.

NB. I don’t have employees…

Engagement:

Marketing will occur across a wealth of platforms and via a variety of methods. Across my own online presences, including my website and blog (www.peter-britton.com) and also via the creation of a sub site. I did this with my last project (www.the-sand-dunes.com) and it was an enormous success. Also, my own social media channels would be used to post regularly (insta – @peterbrittonphoto). My work place (Coleg Gwent and Cardiff MET) are also great at promoting their lecturers professional practice, and social media post/web news would be released also.

There is also the wider photographic community to help, and I have super relationships/collaborations with Ffotogallery and Ffoton.

As for content, there would interviews and set up images/video. Content from the exhibition and launch. Content via workshops and walks. As this is linked to the RNLI who are helping me, and as previously stated already taken me there for a recce, there is wider promotion through their organisation too. I also have an interview lined up with the BBC, and this is expected to air on Wales Today next week. They want to do a follow up piece once the work begins and then when the exhibition is on.

Outreach wise, there will be Workshops (Cyanotypes and Glass cyanotypes) and Guest talks on the use of plastic, safety, from Ross Martin of the RNLI on the history of the rock and the Newton beach walk.

Neewer lighting company have helped me out in the past with exhibition lights and Coleg Gwent have also helped support me through time given in work.

In terms of sharing the experiences, as previously stated this will occur across a wealth of platforms and via a variety of methods. Across my own online presences, including my website and blog (www.peter-britton.com) and also via the creation of a sub site. I did this with my last project (www.the-sand-dunes.com) and it was an enormous success. Also, my own social media channels would be used to post regularly (insta – @peterbrittonphoto). My work place (Coleg Gwent and Cardiff MET) are also great at promoting their lecturers professional practice, and social media post/web news would be released also.

Track record:

I’m a professional photographer and award winning lecturer of 15 years. I studied at both University of Gloucestershire and at University of Glamorgan. My freelance work focuses on large format portraits – http://www.five-by-four.com. After a 15 year career in commercial and wedding photography, my own practice is now more arts based. My work focuses on landscape, with underlying themes of the importance of place and memory. You can see my most recently completed project here: http://www.the-sand-dunes.com

I course lead the BA in Photography at Coleg Gwent. I am a senior fellow of the higher education academy and course leader on the Photography Degree at Coleg Gwent. I am currently studying my MA in Photography at University of Gloucestershire.

Previous exhibitions:

2021 Unit 9, Friars Walk, Newport

2020 National Trust Tredegar House

2020 Ffotogallery Platform

2019 Senedd, Cardiff Bay

2018 Orangery, Tredegar House

2014 Pierhead Building, Cardiff Bay

2010 Grand Pavilion

Key Stages:

Recce – already complete. I needed to do this before the project began to check on viability. As this is somewhat dangerous, and can only be accessed on a couple of intervals across the year, I needed to check that the project is viable before anything else could occur. I have deemed the project viable.

Shoot one – via 5×4 large format photography I intend to photography two wrecks on the rock – SS Liban and the Steep Holm.

Shoot two – drone/aerial footage of the rock to capture the wrecks from the air and the sea surface for the glass cyanotype element.

Shoot three – Video content shoot.

Shoot four – interviews with family members.

Exhibition planning, set up and delivery on talks, workshops and walk.

Across the visits to Tusker, Ross Martin will be assisting me (RNLI).

Covid:

The original intention for this work is as an exhibition. The work is installation based, including sound and video pieces. The alternative to this is to go online. I have a high level of experience in this, as I have previously hosted online showcases for my learners via many online exhibition platforms. The other alternative is a short ‘pop up’ exhibition at an outdoor location overlooking Tusker Rock.


21st July ’21

Research – Edgar Holloway

“Edgar Holloway began engraving at the age of fifteen and was one of the last artists to enjoy the final years of success remaining to the great printmakers of the British Etching Revival. Initially self-taught, though encouraged by the great masters of etching, Muirhead Bone and James McBey, Edgar Holloway received his first formal instruction in etching technique from Joseph Webb and later from the Scottish etcher William Wilson. His work is divided into two phases: the first between 1930 and 1947; the second phase beginning in 1969 and lasting to the early years of the 1990’s.

Having abandoned etched portraiture in 1947, after more than a decade of brilliant workmanship, Edgar Holloway was inspired to re-kindle his youthful talents in etching by the prospect of a visit to America at the invitation of Rev. T. Phelan, one of the American patrons of the Guild of St. Joseph and St. Dominic. The Rev. Phelan had visited the Guild at Ditchling in 1970 and was greatly impressed with Edgar Holloway’s etched portraits from the 1930’s. His enthusiasm inspired Edgar Holloway to undertake a new phase of etched portraiture and Holloway received a commission for twelve etched portraits as a direct result of his American trip. Although Edgar Holloway made many highly accomplished topographical prints and fine portraits, he is best known today for the many penetrating and superbly handled self-portrait etchings through which he revealed his own intriguing persona”.

There is a stoic but sad melancholy to Edgar Holloways work. He described himself as ‘alone’, hence the initial requirement to practice his art on himself, and this feeling comes through in his images. Thought, hope, imaginings, wish… all these things are apparent in his work. Above all, these representations of self make me wonder what Holloway is thinking. In particular within the works above, I feel there is something unspoken. It is as though this work is directed at somebody, or as though he is searching for something. This depth of feeling, of connection, is something that I want to come across in the portraits I take for head/space…

Campbell-fine-art.com. 2021. Biography of Edgar Holloway. [online] Available at: <https://www.campbell-fine-art.com/artists.php?id=193&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].


21st July ’21

Research – Ronald Lowe

Ronald Lowe
English 1932 1985
Venture into the Dales
Watercolour

Autumn journey – Brecon (Watercolour) – Ronald Lowe – 1969

Of Lowe, artuk says “Painter, mural artist, printmaker and teacher, born in Skipton, Yorkshire. He studied at Leeds College of Art, 1949–55, with Richard Macdonald and Keith Lucas, and in London. After serving as an education officer in the Army, taught 1959–71 at Haverfordwest Grammar School, then became Her Majesty’s Inspector, Art, Wales, meanwhile lecturing for many years on history of art, part-time, at University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. Took part in many group shows, including RA, SEA and SWG, AIA and Howard Roberts Gallery, Cardiff. Many one-man shows, starting with Dillwyn Gallery, Swansea, mainly in Wales but also in America. Haverfordwest Civic Society held a commemorative retrospective for Ron Lowe in 1987 and there was an important exhibition at Newport Museum and Art Gallery in 1988.”

Having recently been introduced to the work of Ronald Lowe, I find it to be wonderful. The high vantage points that Lowe takes are potentially an influence to me. Using the drone within both of my potential projects, these high vantage points resonate with my style and technique. I wonder if I can combine Lowe’s beautiful visual aesthetic with something different to create imagery that really stands out. One problem within my head/space project is the fact that I have a disparity in formats, size and quality; 10 x 8 large format photography does not potentially sit well next to drone photography, which has a much lower resolution.

The two images that really stand out to me from Lowe’s work are remarkable in their depth, colour, and mood. That is something that is entirely important within landscape; a sense of mood. The days and conditions that Lowe decides to represent within his pictures are totally wonderful. If I take the ‘venture into the dales’ painting as an example, the warm hues, and the way that the eye leads through the foreground down the road into the abstract movement and shape of the image draws you in and makes the viewer feel familiar and welcome in this landscape. The ‘autumn journey’ watercolour likewise draws you in via the lines that take you through to the mountains but it is a contrast of the complimentary greens and grey is that attracts my eye. Grey and green have long been my two favourite colours, and they always sit well together.

Artuk.org. 2021. Lowe, Ronald, 1932–1985 | Art UK. [online] Available at: <https://artuk.org/discover/artists/lowe-ronald-19321985#&gt; [Accessed 4 August 2021].

Venture into the Dales, E., 2021. Ronald Lowe Venture into the Dales from http://www.bigskyfineart.com. [online] Bigskyfineart.com. Available at: <https://www.bigskyfineart.com/venture-into-the-dales~204&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].


21st July ’21

Email to potential participants for HEAD/SPACE:

H E A D / S P A C E 

I’d like to invite you to be part of my next photographic project. Entitled HEAD/SPACE this project is an investigation into individuals that use a natural landscape for exercise and escape. I aim to photograph people who use a particular natural landscape (possibly their favourite place) for the benefits of both wellbeing and exercise. The project is ultimately about the benefits that are given by a landscape whilst undertaking  exercise pursuits; utilising the natural environment for exercise and wellbeing purposes.

I would like to capture a large format 10×8 colour head and shoulder portrait of you to show you in the environment in which you exercise/escape and an aerial drone photograph to show how small we as humans within the environment. This creates a visual juxtaposition of old (large format film) and new (drone). I aim to also capture some accompanying video footage to further explore your reasons for pursuing activity in a natural landscape.  

I see this project culminating in an exhibition, with large format prints of all participants, lit and suspended from stands, alongside their aerial landscape image. The video piece would be part of the installation and there would also be an accompanying book. 

So, I’m wondering if you are interested in taking part? I wouldn’t need much of your time, and can work around you. Let me know and hope all is well.

Pete.


23rd July ’21

BBC interview

Today my interview for the BBC about ‘Ghost Ships and Tides’ was aired and promoted across BBC news.

The interview appeared across all BBC news platforms, with the lead being taken by BBC Wales News. The piece aired all day across the telly and there was a bigger feature on the Wales Today evening news section. The online feature also featured on the front page of the Main BBC news website, which was amazing!

You can see the web feature here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-wales-57918489

And here is the evening news feature:

It was a great experience being interviewed. I was interviewed by a lovely chap called Matthew Murray. We met on Newton beach, in Porthcawl, and placed Tusker Rock behind us for the interview. I’m quite used to being ‘interviewed’ but this one felt different, as though there was more at stake. I’m really happy with the level of exposure the piece has brought though.


29th July ’21

Following on from a conversation with Spencer Murphy and Tony Clancy in class, we discussed the potential problem with my desired formats within HEAD/SPACE – that being the disparity in scale/quality in 10×8 and drone imagery. Part of the submission for this project would be an exhibition, with the two parts to the project (portrait and landscape) being displayed in large print side by side. The quality difference would be both enormous and apparent. whilst we were talking about this, I had the idea to merge multiple images together to give a greater quality. With the drone, instead of a single image captured from above, I could move closer to the ground, and capture four or more shots of the same scene by manoeuvring the drone around. This would increase the quality once merged by four… I also had the thought of Hockney style joiners. Then, by happenstance, I came upon the work of:

SOHEI NISHINO

These pieces are incredible. Sohei Nishino says of the work:

“Cities are always “amplifying” themselves repeatedly. They emerge and disappear as they continue to integrate themselves. With a camera in hand, I walk through specific cities to take photographs– those of birds’ eye views, of views captured by looking up above me or views from various locations along the road. 

Thereafter, referring to the map, I put together on various canvases all the “fragments” that I have captured, so as to reconstruct my memories to enable myself to render into images the specificity of the respective cities and the appearance of “the present” whose glimpse the cities have given me. By doing so, I try to express again the geographical representations by using the photographs that have captured the specific things and events that are completely different from the symbolic representations on maps. This is my attempt to express the appearance of the cities by integrating my personal experiences and memories. What results is not at all a map to convey precise information, but the record of how I, as a human being, have walked through their streets and how I looked at those streets. Along with being the representation of my awareness, it is that of the appearance of the respective cities as the epitome of their vitality. I try to capture the cities, not necessarily as the entities consisting of the symbolized information and material buildings, but as the fresh and organic Life that is the accumulation of the experiences and activities or the history or memory of the people who live there.

What constitutes the important element of the Series, Diorama in Map, is the constant “movement”. The series is the work that is the deposit of my experiences and the time I have spent in encountering the various phenomena as I move through a certain place. At the same time, by using all my methods of photographing as the elements that constitute a map, I try to actualize in the form of a bird’s-eye-view map, my awareness of the world which spreads out before me, that is, immediately before my eyes. A great many processes are included in the process of producing this work. I can say that each of these processes constitutes a part of my journey through the cities. The reason for that is my belief that photographs are not completed at the moment they are taken, but are completed in the process of recollecting the memories thereafter by confronting them again. I believe that what results from my confronting these enormous number of photographs, and actualizing again in the form of a map by integrating them, is my personal portrait, as well as my representation of the appearance of a specific city whose glimpse it has given me. Moreover, by emphasizing “repetitions” in this series, I try to see the transformation in my personal way of responding to cities and that of my way of communicating them, not to mention the transformations of the cities as structures. I do so by looking at one and the same city at a specific time”.

The image of Hong Kong is a personal favourite:

The visual style is directly related to Hockney, but on an enormous scale. The size of these creations is vast. Sometimes you see something and you immediately connect and that happened with this piece. We see so many images these days via instagram, that it is rare that we (I) look at something and stop. Social media has both enabled us and disabled us in equal measure. But it is worthwhile, for those fleeting moments when something magical passes over the screen of our phone, and we stop scrolling.

The artists gallery (Michael Hoppen) states that “Sohei Nishino was born in Hyogo, Japan in 1982. He graduated from Osaka University of the Arts in 2004, when he began working on his Diorama Map series. Since then he has exhibited his work internationally and gleaned numerous awards including ‘President Award’, Osaka University of Arts (2004), ‘Young Eye Japanese Photographer Association Award’ (2005), ‘Canon New Cosmos Photography Award’ (2005) and the ‘Canon Excellence Award’ (2005).”

By using photography and collage, he creates an alternative view of a city (or place) that both disorientates and binds the viewer in terms of the experience one has when traversing the city streets. By taking predominantly high vantage points, he photographs on 35mm black and white film to create a geographical representation of place through memory and image.

These images have enormous energy. The energy that Sohei Nishino expends whilst making these pieces is transferred directly to the pieces. They bristle with vitality, and I can only imagine what they look like in ‘real life’. There is one on display at the Ashmolean museum in Oxford… https://www.ashmolean.org/tokyo#/&#8230; I might take the kids for a day out.

As for how I could use this… I might try one during the first shoot with my drone. I think I will have to merge several images to achieve the resolution needed to sit next to the 10×8’s, so I might as well have a go at one of these during the experimental stage of HEAD/SPACE. This project in a way circulates around energy, so if I can put some of that energy back into the final pieces, then more the good.

Michael Hoppen Gallery. 2021. Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <https://www.michaelhoppengallery.com/artists/25-sohei-nishino/overview/#/artworks/9577&gt; [Accessed 31 July 2021].

Sohei Nishino. 2021. The JOURNAL by Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <http://soheinishino.net/dioramamap&gt; [Accessed 28 July 2021].


31st July ’21

Ghost ships exhibition

Glass cyan considerations – don’t want it to look like a table. Might use barrels…

I have been thinking about how to create the glass cyanotype pieces for an exhibition. The idea is to print on glass or acrylic imagery of the surface of the sea. Then, underneath there will be displayed photographs of the surface of Tusker rock. This will make the viewer look down through the surface of the sea onto the rock in its watery world below. How to suspend the surface of the sea over the imagery of the rock is still up for consideration. My first thought was circles of glass above the imagery via tables. But they will just look like tables. And I don’t want that. So my next thought goes to items that one would find on a boat or a ship, and one potential option is to use barrels. I quite like this idea, as barrels are not expensive, I could illuminate the image of the rock inside the barrel and the illumination would also make the surface of the sea appear to glow. This would look great for the imagery but… Would the exhibition end up looking like on the inside of a maritime and nautical themed pub… Maybe.

https://www.google.com/search?q=barrels&rlz=1C5CHFA_enGB958GB958&oq=barrels&aqs=chrome..69i57j0i433i457i512j46i175i199i512j0i512l5j46i512j0i512.2324j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

And will try both glass and acrylic:

https://www.plasticsheets.com/perspex-acrylic-disc-cut-to-size/?

https://www.vidaxl.co.uk/e/vidaxl-table-top-tempered-glass-round-600-mm/8718475525165.html?gclid=CjwKCAjwo4mIBhBsEiwAKgzXOMs4AD9r7zkODYA6llfx1Zz35uto1XBcAVX-ewrYyV4iD5wTxAMpmRoCThgQAvD_BwE


1st Aug ’21

Paper Negative experiment

Today I successfully shot some paper negatives in my 5 x 4 view camera. My previous attempt at shooting paper negatives was an unmitigated disaster – I used direct positive fibre-based paper and it quite simply did not work. This time I did nothing different only other than to use ordinary Ilford multigrade resin coated paper. The results are very nice, if somewhat contrasty but that is the norm when undertaking this style of photography. To eliminate some of the contrast I could try pre-flashing the paper under the enlarger, but I actually quite like the extreme heavy contrast within this test shot of my daughter. Considering it is a paper negative, therefore giving the potential not to sit flush within the negative carrier, the result is pretty sharp. I’m not sure if there is an application for this within either of my two potential projects, but there is definitely an application for this within some of my other project ideas and I will certainly be using this as the medium for some future projects.


2nd Aug ’21

Large format 10×8 experiment

On a break whilst in work today I quickly loaded up a slice of 10 x 8 Rollei ortho film into a negative carrier to work out portrait distances for the head/space project. I made a mistake whilst photographing, as you can see from the above image. I foolishly started to pull out the dark slide whilst the lens was open, but I decided to use the piece of film none the less, as this was only a distance setting experiment. Distance wise I’m happy with the resulting image but I’m also very glad I made this mistake with a piece of film that didn’t belong to me so therefore didn’t cost me any incurred expense. When shooting large format photography it is incredibly easy to make silly mistakes. Getting distracted whilst talking, being distracted by passers-by and therefore forgetting to do something is actually a very easy thing to do in large format photography as there is so much to consider and remember when capturing an image. I’m very pleased this happened with this slice of film and not a slice of Kodak portra.


5th August ’21

Today I emailed my contacts in the Senedd about an exhibition for ‘Ghostships and Tides’. Here is the content of the email:

Hi Alice and Lea,

I am once again on the hunt for an exhibition venue, and thought I would start with the Senedd. I have just started making work for a new photographic and video project entitled ‘Ghost ships and tides’, which is a project about Tusker Rock. I have always been fascinated by Tusker Rock. Sitting in the middle of the Bristol Channel, the 500m rock is only visible at low tide and is a notorious hazard for ships. As such it is scattered with ship wrecks. The aim of this project is to create a photographic and video art work about the rock, with the legacy of the lives lost during the industrial revolution at the projects heart.

I have started photographing the rock and the ship wreck remnants via both film and digital processes (5×4, DSLR and Drone), and from these images I wish to create installation pieces using gelatine glass cyanotypes. I see this as an exhibition/installation comprised of a combination of sea glass cyan abstractions (circular glass layers gelatine cyan printed with the surface of the sea through which the viewer can observe the shipwrecks (drone shots) below), printed large format imagery, a moving image piece and an accompanying sound installation.

I have performed shoot one, and the imagery from digital sources and film sources are really successful. On the 25th June I was fortunate enough to visit Tusker Rock with RNLI crew-members Ross Martin and Frank Benton. Traversing the rock was amazing, as the rock appears to absorbing the wrecks. The wrecks are scattered across the rock, with the SS Liban laying as a skeletal remain on the West side and the Steep Holm gradually breaking down on the East. As it was such a gentle day, the sounds of the small waves lapping at the rocks was tranquil and calming, but I can only imagine what it must be like to be standing on the rock in gale force winds, with roaring waves boiling in the background. To be shipwrecked, at night, at a time when there was no RNLI or rescue service, with the knowledge that once the tide rose the rock that you stood upon would sink into the salty brine must have been horrific. All of that feeling swam upon me as I stood there on that peaceful day amongst the watery graves, and it is for those lives lost that I am making the work.

Once I got back on board the yacht I had an overwhelming sense of peace and calm. On the way home we sailed over the wreck of The Mellany. The Mellany, a coal steamer that was travelling from Cardiff to Rio De Janeiro, hit the rock in 1886, foundered and now rests on the channel floor off the coast of Newton dunes.

I feel it is important for history to be made into art. The lives lost on this rock were diverse; for example the most prominent wreck is the S.S. Liban, a French ship carrying Iron Ore from 1882. I intend to try to find relatives from the wreck and photograph them to show the diversity of industry and interconnectedness.

Art that delves into history unknown is a fascinating thing. To create art about an event, place or moments in eras past allows art to evolve and the past to inspire. Again, I foresee this as an amazing exhibition, and alongside my lecturing links, there is a wealth of opportunity for myself to deliver workshops on the history of the rock/wrecks/legacy and within photographic processes themselves, should that be beneficial to the Senedd.

I was recently interviewed by the BBC about the work in progress project. You can see the interview here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-wales-57918489

I would love the Senedd to be the venue where this exhibition happens. It all fits; industrial history, history unknown, art and education of a landmark that until now was little known about. I would not be looking to exhibit the work until December…

Let me know if we can have a meeting… I can show you imagery, video and a preview of how the glass cyanotypes will look.

Thanks!

Pete.


6th August ’21

I’ve had a response from the Senned, and they have a backlog of exhibition, which is understandable. Here’s the response:


6th August ’21

Music and poetry

A few good things have come from the BBC interview. Lots of people are talking about it, and the piece was most watched on BBC Wales section for three days straight. I have also been contacted by a musician who makes music based on the Welsh coastline and a Poet.

The musician I have been contacted by is Gareth Bouch. His band is the rain dogs, and the ambient sounds they make are perfect as an accompaniment. Here is a copy of the communication:

So I can basically use the music for free, as long as there is a mention. The music is very appropriate as it is ambient background, rather than the ‘star of the show’.

I was also contacted by a local poet, Tony Curtis (I don’t think it’s the Tony Curtis). Here’s the communication:

Dear Peter Britton,

I read with interest about your Tusker Rock project. I have known these rocks and of their importance to

the imaginative life of the area for some years, as we were regular visitors to Dannie Abse’s house in Ogmore.

I wrote this poem back in the autumn; it is unpublished, but will be included in my eleventh collection Leaving the Hills from Seren next year.

I share this with you for your interest and would be happy if you felt that it would be appropriate for the project.

Do feel free to call me if you wish to discuss this.

Sincerely,

Tony Curtis.

Again, like the music, the poem is fitting. Here is a copy:

Dannie’s Rock

Countless low tides leaving the Ogmore beach wide

for walks, French cricket and burying fathers.

Out to the west, half way to England, it seems,

The sea baring its black teeth shows Tusker Rock,

Ynys Twsgwr, tu skar, stark above the flat water,

Fangs shown only because of the wrecks –

A wheelhouse, ribs, blown open boiler room,

Propellor, capstan, winch and chains,

The long-broken spine of the S.S. Liban lost in a storm,

And many others. The dead sailors and a child,

All those who floundered, drowned, falling

From the tilting decks to their cold deaths.

A colony of starfish and mussels and goose barnacles

Live and prosper on what we leave.

The sea scans the same measured syllables,

Songs that sound out of the scored waves.

There are more stories to tell –  Britten, Debussy,

Always more music to raise from the chains of the deep;

For these blind rocks, Dannie,

Could never satisfy the hungers of our sea.

I could use this poem within the video element, aural element or as text, I am yet to determine…

From that I researched Dannie Abse, and came across this poem, which references Tusker Rock:

A Letter From Ogmore – Danni Abse

Goodbye, 20th Century. 
What should I mourn? 
Hiroshima? Auschwitz? 
Our friend, Carmi, said, 
‘Thank forgetfulness 
else we could not live; 
thank memory 
else we’d have no life.’ 

Goodbye, 20th Century. 
What shall I celebrate? 
Darling, I’m out of date: 
even my nostalgia 
is becoming history. 
Those garish, come-on posters 
outside a cinema, 
announce the Famous 
I’ve never heard of. 
So many other friends, too, 
now like Carmi, have joined 
a genealogy of ghosts. 

But here, this mellow evening, 
on these high cliffs I look down 
to read the unrolling 
holy scrolls of the sea. They are 
blank. The enigma is alive 
and, for the Present, I boast, 
thumbs in lapels, I survive. 

Delightful Eros 
still hauls Reason along 
zig-zag on a taut leash. 
I’m still unsettled by 
the silence in framed pictures, 
foreground and background; 
or the mastery of music 
over mind. And I hail 
the world within a word. 
I do not need to be 
a fabulist like Iolo 
who, from this same coast, 
would see seven sails 
where there was but one. 

Goodbye, 20th Century, 
your trumpets and your drums, 
your war-wounds still unhealed. 
Goodbye, I-must-leave-you-Dolly, 
goodbye Lily Marlene. 
Has the Past always a future? 

Will there always be 
a jackboot on the stair, 
a refugee to roam? 
A man with no roots is lost 
like the darkness in the forest, 
and it costs 100 years 
for a hiding place 
to become a home. 

Now secular strangers come 
sealed in Fords and Nissans, 
a congregation of cars, 
to this opening estuary 
so various, so beautiful, so old. 
The tide is out. 
And from the reeledin 
sea – not from 
the human mind’s vexed fathoms – 
the eternal, murderous, 
fanged Tusker Rock is revealed. 

Abse, D., 2021. PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine – Two Poems – Dannie Abse – PN Review 118. [online] Pnreview.co.uk. Available at: <https://www.pnreview.co.uk/cgi-bin/scribe?item_id=94&gt; [Accessed 5 August 2021].


5th Aug ’21

Meeting with RNLI crewmembers

I’ve just got back from a meeting (in a pub) with the RNLI. I took the opportunity to show them the large format imagery captured on visit one, the digital stills and the video diary. We met in the Jennings Building in Porthcawl, which is important in it’s own right – I’ll come to that in a moment. During the meeting, they were impressed with that which I have shot so far. We also discussed a return trip, hopefully on the summer equinox (Sept 22nd). Photographing aims of shoot two are pinhole large format transparency film, taking the drone over the other side, drone shots of the rock straight down, a combo drone shot of the rock (Hockney-esque), and 10×8 imagery of where the sea meets the rock. I feel this last part is important, as it is this ‘edge’ that plays such a vital role. Visually, it is our stimuli for leaving, and is is also what the sailors must have been observant of, and terrified by…

I want to see if I can find the remains of the Anne and Teresa – 1806 – January 30th, the “Anne & Teresa”, Penclawdd for Bristol, ran onto the Nash Sands. The crew of three were saved, as was the cargo. The vessel was lost.

I also during the meeting managed to secure Porthcawl museum as an exhibition venue, and have decided to pursue the National Museum and the Waterfront museum as potential venues. I was also given the great idea to include the sounds of the buoy at ‘marks’ Tusker in the video and aural installations.

The Jennings building itself is worth a mention at this point, as it has a rich maritime history:

“Built 1832 by James Allen, the proprietor of a spelter works at Dyffryn, as the S terminus of the Dyffryn Llynfi Porthcawl horsedrawn tramroad which was built under an Act of 1825 to transport iron and coal from the Llynfi valley; the Act provided for a new harbour at Pwll Cawl, a rocky promontory amidst the surrounding sand dunes or warrens. Total cost £60,000. Shown on Tithe Map of 1846 and described in the apportionment as a ‘warehouse of the Llynfi Iron Company’ leased from the Dyffryn Llynfi and Porthcawl Railway Company. It was used as a store for iron and iron goods awaiting shipment and is much larger than the few other surviving examples, perhaps as a result of high early expectations of a trading future, or to provide for storage during bad weather, as at some periods the dock was only fully in use during the summer months. Name dates from 1911 when it was used by Jennings and Co, timber importers. In 1920s was part of Cosy Corner site, with Cosy Corner cinema, a converted aeroplane hanger, and Pierrot stage erected to W; to NW was an outdoor roller skating rink with the first floor of Jennings building also being used as a roller skating rink; to N was the Salt Lake for Swimming and Boating created from the former inner dock and to S was the slipway and harbour where paddle steamers called for day trips. In Second World War warehouse became a base for RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch”.

Whilst we were sat, I looked up and noticed the nautical map on the wall above us… And prominent above our heads was Tusker Rock!

Britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. 2021. Jennings Warehouse, Porthcawl, Bridgend. [online] Available at: <https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/300011369-jennings-warehouse-porthcawl#.YQ42GtNKjlw&gt; [Accessed 8 August 2021].


11th Aug

Nash point shoot


12th Aug

Conversations with first two HEAD/SPACE participants


18th Aug

Whiteford Sands Lighthouse shoot


19th Aug

Response for funding

Application Number 2021002989 – Ghost Ships and Tides

Dear Peter,

I regret to inform you that after careful consideration, the Arts Council of Wales has decided not to approve your request for funding of £3,000.00 towards the above.

In a competitive round, we did not feel that you had sufficiently evidenced how you meet our priorities for support as strongly as others considered.

The main reason for this decision was:

After assessing your application, we were very interested in the project proposal and theme. However, we felt that it would have benefitted from more detail about the presenting partner. We were clear that the quality of your work was high, and there was a keenness to support but ultimately we felt there needed to be more detail about the end product in terms of the exhibition proposal.

I appreciate that this will be a disappointment to you.  If you would like to discuss your application further, please contact your Arts Council of Wales Officer.

Cerys Thomas

Cerys.Thomas@arts.wales

The application and the reason(s) for this decision is available to view on the Portal under ‘Submitted Applications’, please click here to log in.

Information about other support available to you is regularly updated on our website: https://arts.wales/funding


24th Aug ’21

My work, ‘Middle of the road’, is part of the Noorderlicht International Photo Festival 2021: The Makeable Mind. The festival is on over 16 locations and features over 70 artists. 

Groningen: 7 Aug – 3 Oct (12 noon – 6 pm) ||| The Hague: 28 Aug – 28 Nov ||| Friesland: 4 Sep – 31 Oct.


25th Aug ’21

Whiteford lighthouse print


25th Aug ’21

Research – project idea


30th Aug ’21

Altmark shoot, Sker/Morfa beach

This morning I visited the MPV Altmark shipwreck on Sker Beach, near Port Talbot. I took a short drive from my house to a tiny little church orientated village called Mawdlam, where I parked and walked the 4 1/2 miles down to Skate beach. The walk was tricky, as on my back I had my 10 x 8 camera, my pinhole camera, a small tripod for the pinhole, my drone, a large heavyweight tripod for the 10 x 8, and my Canon digital SLR. Not to mention large format 10 x 8 and 5 x 4 dark slides. I decided to go this morning because conditions were perfect; beautiful clouds, no wind, and something that has become all important; the position of the tide. The sea really is ruling this project in many ways. It’s about the sea and the effect that it has had upon lives, pleasure and industry. It is about the tide and the position of the tide, both for me within this project and enabling capability to shoot and it is the deciding factor in whether a ship has easy passage or the potential to flounder. The title ghost ships and tides came from a song I was listening to. But the title has become entirely relevant to the project as tides are the dominant force and I’m photographing ghost ships.

After the hike onto the beach I was presented with a beautiful view of Sker beach. This is a place regularly frequented by myself and my children and it is a marvel to behold. As you stand on the shoreline you have Port Talbot steelworks to your right. This enormous venue with its imposing industrial structures is both an eyesore and a marvel of industry. It is horrible, as the pollution that it exudes on a daily basis is enormous but visually it is totally striking. As I stood on the shoreline with the scent of the ocean and the warm morning breeze bombarding my senses I knew that this was going to be a good shoot. I started with the digital SLR, as it is portable, lightweight and always gives me a good basis for creating the best large format images. Large format takes an awful lot of consideration technically and compositionally, so if I’m able to work out the best shots from a small handheld camera before capturing the important large format imagery, then all the better. Not that I’m belittling what one can do with a digital SLR. It is after all my go to camera for every day use it is an entirely remarkable thing and will capture both enormous digital images and 8K video. Once I had finished recording the lay of the land digitally, I turned to the 10 x 8.

I had two darkslides, therefore four images that I could make on black-and-white Rollei 25 film and I set about creating my first image. Immediately I was presented with a problem, as between the Whiteford sands shoot and this shoot the spring appears to have ‘gone’ in the lens. Which is a big problem. I will dismantle the lens this evening to see what is afoot. I persevered though and decided to keep shooting. The problem with this is that the shutter would not work, so to counter this problem I decided to shoot on F 64 therefore giving myself as long exposure as possible. By simply opening up the lens I was able to allow the light in. With a short exposure this is problematic as this creates visible camera shake as the lever to open the lens is heavy and clunky. By using F 64 I was afforded a 15 second exposure which should alleviate the issue of initial opening and closing of the aperture. I hope so, I’ll see you tomorrow when I develop the film!

After the 10 x 8 I photographed 5 x 4 transparency pinhole imagery. I only loaded two slices of the film for the shoot. I knew which two images I wanted to make, as previously said I have knowledge of this wreck. Finally I moved to the drone. I am becoming rather affectionate towards my tiny flying camera. It’s wonderful. It records wonderful 4K footage. It captures beautiful raw imagery. It is quite a wonderful thing. I am still in two minds about the worth of drone photography overall. You see a lot of it these days; it gets overused and it always tends to look the same. My own drone imagery is currently looking very much similar to that which anybody could capture. But it is a very worthwhile addition to this forthcoming project. Especially the video element. I only used one battery and spent around 30 minutes in the air capturing imagery and video footage. When I’m capturing footage I’m trying to do the same thing for each and every location, or shipwreck, that I capture. In my mind I am planning the video and results and if I have consistency with capture it means that I will be able to blend the images together so that one shipwreck becomes another in the flash of a frame.

One thing that keeps popping into my mind as I’m using the drone is the work of Ronald Lowe. I love the look of his paintings, they are totally wonderful. They remind me of what you can do with a drone to capture photography from the air. The two are by no means comparable, as one in my own opinion and hold little gravitas while the work of Lowe is entirely mind blowing. I love it. And I am considering it every time I put the drone in the air – what can I do to impart some of Lowe’s wonder into ordinary, standard drone photography? How can I get some of that splendour, some of that visual or into modern technology? At this point, I really don’t know. It was a great shoot if rather exhausting! But that will be the flavour of this project. Multiple cameras once again just like my sand project. This will be an exhibition, so variety of imagery surrounding the one topic I feel is important. So all of the shoots from here on in will involve all of these four different methods of capture.

To walk to and from the car to the beach is worth mentioning also. I walked straight through Kenfig nature reserve, which is the other dune system in Porthcawl. So as I strolled this morning I had a familiar link to my dunes, Newton Burrows. After 9 miles of walking with all the equipment I returned to the car by 10 o’clock in the morning and a much deserved Bacon sandwich.


1st Sept ’21

Photographing Cefn Sidan today. I am focusing on one wreck again (the SV Paul) carrying 10 x 8, five by for transparency pinhole, drone and digital SLR. Conditions are perfect with very low-lying cloud creating a perfect filter for the light and a wonderful roof for the imagert. Is a perfect morning. No wind so the drone fries easily and the large format camera should be nice and stable. One issue I have with the large for my camera is that I have not been able to fix the spring so I am again closing down dress 64, I’m using the aperture to make the exposure this is not ideal as the initial opening and closing of the aperture will definitely create bubble. I’m hoping that the resulting long exposure, around 15 seconds or so, Will eliminate too much camera shake.

The shoot itself was really good. To charts on all formats. I’m conscious that I am photographing this project in four different ways company. Two of these methods are becoming very important – drone imagery and video and the 10 x 8 imagery. The digital SLR work is mainly for reference and enabling me to work out the best shot for the 10 x 8. I don’t wanna waste film if I can get the best image in one hit via experimentation in the process that doesn’t cost anything then all the better. Direct itself was very impressive. Comparable in size to the steep home on Tesco rock there are nine pieces of metal and wooden beams Angling app out of the beach. This rate can be seen from miles away. Kevin said and sends is there a markable stretch of beach. It goes on and on and on for miles. There are other ex hear that ice have seen from a distance today. I shall return to investigate further.


2nd Sept ’21

I returned to Cefn Sidan Sands today to photograph the two wrecks that I found last time. They are beautiful structures laying adjacent to one another, and they were great to shoot. Conditions were again very good. I had to plan my visit around the tides and the sea but as I was only there yesterday this was an easy task as I already knew the lay of the land and where the sea would be. Same equipment as last time, same conditions as last time.

The image that I’m really excited about making is the multiple drone image inspired by Sohei Nishino. This end result will give an overview of the entirety of Tusker rock… I’m really excited about that picture.

It’s somewhat bizarre being amongst these remains. The main parts of the ships and boats have long since rotted away and all that remain are hard skeletal structures. That’s why this is so fascinating, the images are really about death; death of the ship itself… death of the people who sailed the seas. They look like skeletons jutting out of the sand.  Which essentially makes this beach a graveyard. Lives and vessels lost at sea.


6th Sept ’21

Cyanolumen experiments. These images have been made using an image of a shipwreck, printed on acetate, then printed on expired darkroom photo paper. Then, the images have been coated in cyanotype solution and solarfast, and whilst wet, exposed for a second time.


7th Sept ’21

https://www.worldseafishing.com/threads/tusker-rock-reef-shipwrecks.2014234/


8th Sept ’21

http://www.swanseadocks.co.uk/docksnewsite/contribron2.html


9th Sept ’21


10th Sept ’21


10th Sept ’21


11th Sept ’21

PhotoLondon visit


Bibliography

Abse, D., 2021. PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine – Two Poems – Dannie Abse – PN Review 118. [online] Pnreview.co.uk. Available at: <https://www.pnreview.co.uk/cgi-bin/scribe?item_id=94&gt; [Accessed 5 August 2021].

Artuk.org. 2021. Lowe, Ronald, 1932–1985 | Art UK. [online] Available at: <https://artuk.org/discover/artists/lowe-ronald-19321985#&gt; [Accessed 4 August 2021].

Britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. 2021. Jennings Warehouse, Porthcawl, Bridgend. [online] Available at: <https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/300011369-jennings-warehouse-porthcawl#.YQ42GtNKjlw&gt; [Accessed 8 August 2021].

Campbell-fine-art.com. 2021. Biography of Edgar Holloway. [online] Available at: <https://www.campbell-fine-art.com/artists.php?id=193&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].

Loughrey, C., 2021. The Lighthouse review: A claustrophobic horror filled with sweaty desire, sickly jealousy, and unbridled rage. [online] The Independent. Available at: <https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/lighthouse-review-robert-pattinson-willem-dafoe-trailer-a9143576.html&gt; [Accessed 22 July 2021].

Michael Hoppen Gallery. 2021. Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <https://www.michaelhoppengallery.com/artists/25-sohei-nishino/overview/#/artworks/9577&gt; [Accessed 31 July 2021].

Sohei Nishino. 2021. The JOURNAL by Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <http://soheinishino.net/dioramamap&gt; [Accessed 28 July 2021].

Venture into the Dales, E., 2021. Ronald Lowe Venture into the Dales from http://www.bigskyfineart.com. [online] Bigskyfineart.com. Available at: <https://www.bigskyfineart.com/venture-into-the-dales~204&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].