14th July ’21

Peter Britton – Project Proposals for Major Project

Idea One:

The Sun Ablaze or The Sun of a New Day

Test images

Entitled either ‘The Sun Ablaze’ or ‘The Sun of a New Day’ this is a visual, photographic and artistic interpretation of National Trust locations across Wales. Overall, the project will be about the diversity of the Welsh landscape (place), the history of each of the NT sites (memory), topographic variety, and the range of different plant specimens across Wales.

Using the camera-less photographic process of Cyanotype, combined with poured acrylic art I would like to produce a piece of art for each of the 50+ National Trust venues across Wales. You can see my initial experiments here, and get a feel for how the finished pieces will appear:

https://www.peter-britton.com/sense-of-place

The objects/items I would use for this project would come from the National Trust venues, so would therefore involve me collecting and taking leaves, flowers, soil samples, water, etc, and creating the pieces in the landscape.

The final pieces would feature manipulated folds in the paper to incorporate topographical features of the environment. My main inspiration for this comes from my previous project (S A N D), and the engagement I had with Meghann Riepenhoff’s work.

Littoral Drift #93 (Shine Tidelands, Port Ludlow, WA 01.02.17, Five Waves During Tidal Drawback); 42×93″

The project would culminate in an exhibition of the final pieces at one of National Trusts prestigious locations, with potential for a wider exhibition, hopefully in the Senedd in Cardiff Bay where I have exhibited several times previously and have strong links. There could also be potential for a (National Trust?) photobook linked to this project, within which the project narrative is revealed and the artworks are showcased with a description/story of the venue/process description on the facing page.

Research so far: Meghann Riepenhoff, Susan Derges, Adam Jeppesen, Josef Nadj, Andy Goldsworthy.

Idea Two:

H E A D / S P A C E

Misty, 2005, Alec Soth                                                                              On The Beach, 2007, Richard Misrach

This project is an investigation into individuals that use a natural landscape for exercise and escape. I aim to photograph people who use a particular natural landscape (their favourite place) for the benefits of wellbeing. It is about the benefits that are given by a landscape whilst undertaking their exercise pursuits; utilising the natural environment for exercise and wellbeing purposes. This brings my previous projects into sharp perspective as all of the themes that I have been working towards are realised via this project – place, memory and wellbeing. This project however steps away from ‘me’, and opens up challenges and difficulties as I attempt to uncover these themes within other people. Visually, I aim to photograph via large format 10×8 colour head and shoulder portraits to show the subject in the environment and aerial drone photography to show the smallness of the subject within the environment. This creates a visual juxtaposition of old (large format film) and new (drone). I want to photograph at least twelve individuals within this project, including a mountain biker, surfer, river kayaker, wild swimmer, rock climber, etc…

There will be an accompanying video piece that looks in depth (via interviews) at three of these characters to further explore their reasons for pursuing activity in a natural landscape.

I see this project culminating in an exhibition, with large format prints of all participants, lit and suspended from stands, alongside their aerial landscape image. The video piece would be part of the installation. There would also be an accompanying book.

Research so far:

Richard Misrach – On The Beach

Markus Torgeby – under the open skies

Alec Soth – MAIN INFLUENCE

Jonathan Bielaski

Madeline Waller – east London swimmers

John Mayers

Martin Schoeller – big heads

August Sander

Jeff Wall (portraits)

Rineke Dijkstra

Dana Lixenburg

Idea Three:

Ghostships and Tides

Peter Britton, Boiler, 2021

I have always been fascinated by Tusker Rock. Sitting in the middle of the Bristol Channel, the 500m rock is only visible at low tide and is a notorious hazard for ships. The aim of this project is to create a legacy for the men and women who lost their lives to the rock.

I recently stumbled upon an article on Wales online about Tusker Rock (https://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/tiny-island-welsh-coast-graveyard-15519672). The Wales online article revealed to me that Tusker Rock is a graveyard for shipwrecked vessels and has ‘killed’ an extraordinary number of people throughout history. I then watched Hidden Wales (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08sfk5l) and by happy circumstance my friend knows Ross Martin very well. As such I organised through him to go out to Tusker Rock on 25th June, and have completed one shoot using large format 5×4, DSLR and Drone Cameras.

Peter Britton, SS Liban, 2021

My intentions are to create a photographic and video art work about the rock, but with the legacy of the lives lost at the projects heart. In Hidden Wales, Ross Martin says “Something should be done to remember the lives of those lost”… I think this is where my project comes in.   

I intend to photograph the rock and the wreck remnants via both film and digital processes (5×4, DSLR and Drone), but to then create installation pieces using gelatine glass cyanotypes. I see this as an exhibition/installation comprised of sea glass cyan abstractions (circular glass layers gelatine cyan printed with the surface of the sea through which the viewer can observe the shipwrecks (drone shots) below), printed large format imagery, a moving image piece and an accompanying sound installation.

On Friday 9th July I was interviewed by the BBC about the project, with a 3 minute segment going out on BBC Wales Today on Wednesday 14th.

Bibliography

Lensculture. 2021. [online] Available at: <https://www.lensculture.com/articles/richard-misrach-on-the-beach&gt; [Accessed 13 July 2021].

Magnum Photos. 2021. Niagara Alec Soth, Magnum Photos Magnum Photos. [online] Available at: <https://www.magnumphotos.com/arts-culture/society-arts-culture/revisiting-alec-soths-niagara/&gt; [Accessed 13 July 2021].

Meghannriepenhoff.com. 2021. Littoral Drift | Meghann Riepenhoff. [online] Available at: <http://meghannriepenhoff.com/project/littoral-drift/&gt; [Accessed 12 July 2021].


15th July ’21

Tusker Rock shoot 25th June

On the 25th June I was fortunate enough to visit Tusker Rock with RNLI crew-members Ross Martin and Frank Benton. I was unsure as to whether this was going to be a recce, a shoot or the start of something big, so I went prepared. I took my 5×4 large format with 24 sheets of film, my DSLR and my drone.

We set off from Porthcawl Harbour at 10am, and the conditions were perfect. We could only access the rock if the seas were calm and the wind low, and these two factors were present on the day. It was a wonderful event. I’ve lived in Porthcawl all my life, but never sailed out of the harbour on a boat. It took about an hour to get to the rock. The traverse is treacherous, as pillars of rock point to the sky from the seafloor, making the passage through the Bristol channel very dangerous. As we moved towards the rock, we were followed by porpoise and we reached the rock at the exact correct time for ease of access. We moved from the yacht to the dingy and rowed ashore.

The experience was amazing. I had the best 1.5 hours with extremely high levels of productivity. Moving between camera formats is always difficult and something that I dislike doing, but in this instance it was successful. I always feel that if you don’t focus on one thing, then something always goes awry… but the shoot was so well planned that these three incredibly different processes worked well as separate methods. The drone was there to capture imagery directly from on top, the slr was to capture general stills and video and the 5×4 was the main capture method to show the wrecks.

Some examples of the 5×4 shots:

The imagery from digital sources and film sources are really successful. Traversing the rock was amazing, as the rock appears to absorbing the wrecks. The wrecks are scattered across the rock, with the SS Liban laying as a skeletal remain on the West side and the Steep Holm gradually breaking down on the East. As it was such a gentle day, the sounds of the small waves lapping at the rocks was tranquil and calming, but I can only imagine what it must be like to be standing on the rock in gale force winds, with roaring waves boiling in the background. To be shipwrecked, at night, at a time when there was no RNLI or rescue service, with the knowledge that once the tide rose the rock that you stood upon would sink into the salty brine must have been horrific. All of that feeling swam upon me as I stood there on that peaceful day amongst the watery graves.

Once I got back on board the yacht I had an overwhelming sense of peace and calm. On the way home we sailed over the wreck of The Mellany. The Mellany, a coal steamer that was travelling from Cardiff to Rio De Janeiro, hit the rock in 1886, foundered and now rests on the channel floor off the coast of Newton dunes.

I feel as though I got everything I needed, but not necessarily everything I wanted from the shoot. I wish to return, to get more drone footage from above and more digital coverage.

Contact sheets:

SLR:

Drone:


16th July ’21

The Lighthouse – film research for Tusker Rock

Well… I watched ‘The Lighthouse’ last night. It was excellent. I enjoy films that have a certain artistic agenda, and this absolutely did. I’m not an enormous fan of the ‘blockbuster’ style of movie making, and I certainly don’t like superhero films, so when I sit down to enjoy a film I do want to be able to take something of worth away.

Dir: Robert Eggers. Starring: Willem Dafoe, Robert Pattinson, and Valeriia Karaman. 15 cert, 109 mins, 2019

Loughrey (2020) says ‘The Lighthouse deals with madness, but in a form that feels ancient and mythical in its nature. Eggers not only draws from the old folk tales and superstitions sailors used to cling to as the only way to bring reason and order to the all-consuming chaos of the sea, but from Greek mythology, too. There are nods to Icarus, Prometheus, and Proteus. Eggers never delineates between reality and dream, leaving us to decide for ourselves whether the island is cursed by some otherworldly power or whether this is all some kind of hallucination. In The Lighthouse, a seagull might just be a seagull, but there’s also a chance it’s a harbinger of evil. Only the sea knows”.

There is a lot that I can draw from this movie. When I create moving video pieces, they do tend to be a little ‘ordinary’. I very much appreciate the visual aesthetic of this film, but more importantly, the sound. The foghorn that permeates the film is extraordinary, and adds such a vast depth of impeding doom. Ghostships and Tides will have an accompanying audio piece, that will now be based around the sound of a fog horn.

Loughrey, C., 2021. The Lighthouse review: A claustrophobic horror filled with sweaty desire, sickly jealousy, and unbridled rage. [online] The Independent. Available at: <https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/lighthouse-review-robert-pattinson-willem-dafoe-trailer-a9143576.html&gt; [Accessed 22 July 2021].


18th July ’21

Research – ship wreck website

https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?151434

This could be a useful resource. It is a website that documents ship wrecks internationally. I’m not currently sure where the project will lead (ie. Stay on Tusker, or move further afield?), but this site could prove useful…

The Liban is on there, but info is scant:

https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?233087


20th July ’21

Application – Arts Council Wales

As a trial for filling in the type of application, I have submitted for funding for ‘Ghostships and Tides’. Via the Arts Council Wales website, I have applied for a £3000 grant… I have done this as an experiment to try the application process and use it as a learning curve. I do not expect to receive funding, but can learn from the experience…

Application notes:

I foresee this as an exhibition. I have previously exhibited in the Welsh Assembly Building (The Senedd), but have wide links to galleries and organisations. I recently had an exhibition in Newport, on Friars Walk in a pop up gallery (https://www.the-sand-dunes.com/the-exhibition) and have access to this space once again. My audience would be all generations and ethnic backgrounds, particularly those with an interest in maritime events, but the project would appeal to many. I would also be holding workshops about the cyanotype procedure and gelatine glass cyanotype procedure for the general public.

This project would link to the RNLI, as they would help facilitate my safe passage to the rock.

The wider impact of having this support would enable the exhibition/workshops to take place. The creation of the circular cyan gelatine pieces is costly. I would attempt to involve the wider community via interviews about the rock, and interview/involve family members of those who lost their lives in the channel. The project by default creates a legacy for the men and women who perished at sea through history.

As the exhibition will hopefully take place in a prominent location in either Newport or Cardiff, the diversity of individuals who have the opportunity to see the project would be incredibly large. I feel it is important for history to be made into art. The lives lost on this rock were diverse; for example the most prominent wreck is the S.S. Liban, a French ship carrying Iron Ore from 1882. I intend to try to find relatives from the wreck and photograph them to show the diversity of industry and interconnectedness.

Knowledge of the danger of the Bristol Channel is little known across the nation, and I intend to show how treacherous this aquatic graveyard is by holding talks and photographic demonstrations. I have strong links to the BAME community in Cardiff, as I am also a photographic lecturer and have created courses in the Wales Millennium Centre (alongside Yusuf Hussein) to help young individuals find a creative path. More of the same could be done within this project. You can read about the course I set up here: https://www.coleggwent.ac.uk/news/a-focus-on-photography-with-ethnic-minority-communities

Art that delves into history unknown is a fascinating thing. To create art about an event, place or moments in eras past allows art to evolve and the past to inspire. Again, I foresee this as an exhibition, and alongside my lecturing links, there is a wealth of opportunity for myself to deliver workshops on the history of the rock/wrecks/legacy and within photographic processes themselves. As an educator, this is a great opportunity to give people that inspirational first step, that could promote a career in the arts.

Cultural contract:

The impact of developing a greater understanding of local maritime disasters could help bring a greater level of understanding about safety in the oceans and the sea. By investigating the past, this project has enormous potential to help with current problems, such as the importance of safety in the waves, safe passage through dangerous sea courses and wider concerns, such as plastic in the oceans.

As a lecturer, there is scope to deliver my own workshops throughout the exhibition, but also to organise guest speakers about these wider issues. I did this recently, with my previous project, and one thing that was was of enormous benefit to the community was a guided tour that I led. I could do the same, on Newton Beach, where I discuss the rock and wider concerns related to the sea. This would be a great opportunity for the wider community to be present, engaged and taking part interactively.

By having the exhibition somewhere prominent, this would also easy access for cultural diversity and expansion of understanding across wider communities.

NB. I don’t have employees…

Engagement:

Marketing will occur across a wealth of platforms and via a variety of methods. Across my own online presences, including my website and blog (www.peter-britton.com) and also via the creation of a sub site. I did this with my last project (www.the-sand-dunes.com) and it was an enormous success. Also, my own social media channels would be used to post regularly (insta – @peterbrittonphoto). My work place (Coleg Gwent and Cardiff MET) are also great at promoting their lecturers professional practice, and social media post/web news would be released also.

There is also the wider photographic community to help, and I have super relationships/collaborations with Ffotogallery and Ffoton.

As for content, there would interviews and set up images/video. Content from the exhibition and launch. Content via workshops and walks. As this is linked to the RNLI who are helping me, and as previously stated already taken me there for a recce, there is wider promotion through their organisation too. I also have an interview lined up with the BBC, and this is expected to air on Wales Today next week. They want to do a follow up piece once the work begins and then when the exhibition is on.

Outreach wise, there will be Workshops (Cyanotypes and Glass cyanotypes) and Guest talks on the use of plastic, safety, from Ross Martin of the RNLI on the history of the rock and the Newton beach walk.

Neewer lighting company have helped me out in the past with exhibition lights and Coleg Gwent have also helped support me through time given in work.

In terms of sharing the experiences, as previously stated this will occur across a wealth of platforms and via a variety of methods. Across my own online presences, including my website and blog (www.peter-britton.com) and also via the creation of a sub site. I did this with my last project (www.the-sand-dunes.com) and it was an enormous success. Also, my own social media channels would be used to post regularly (insta – @peterbrittonphoto). My work place (Coleg Gwent and Cardiff MET) are also great at promoting their lecturers professional practice, and social media post/web news would be released also.

Track record:

I’m a professional photographer and award winning lecturer of 15 years. I studied at both University of Gloucestershire and at University of Glamorgan. My freelance work focuses on large format portraits – http://www.five-by-four.com. After a 15 year career in commercial and wedding photography, my own practice is now more arts based. My work focuses on landscape, with underlying themes of the importance of place and memory. You can see my most recently completed project here: http://www.the-sand-dunes.com

I course lead the BA in Photography at Coleg Gwent. I am a senior fellow of the higher education academy and course leader on the Photography Degree at Coleg Gwent. I am currently studying my MA in Photography at University of Gloucestershire.

Previous exhibitions:

2021 Unit 9, Friars Walk, Newport

2020 National Trust Tredegar House

2020 Ffotogallery Platform

2019 Senedd, Cardiff Bay

2018 Orangery, Tredegar House

2014 Pierhead Building, Cardiff Bay

2010 Grand Pavilion

Key Stages:

Recce – already complete. I needed to do this before the project began to check on viability. As this is somewhat dangerous, and can only be accessed on a couple of intervals across the year, I needed to check that the project is viable before anything else could occur. I have deemed the project viable.

Shoot one – via 5×4 large format photography I intend to photography two wrecks on the rock – SS Liban and the Steep Holm.

Shoot two – drone/aerial footage of the rock to capture the wrecks from the air and the sea surface for the glass cyanotype element.

Shoot three – Video content shoot.

Shoot four – interviews with family members.

Exhibition planning, set up and delivery on talks, workshops and walk.

Across the visits to Tusker, Ross Martin will be assisting me (RNLI).

Covid:

The original intention for this work is as an exhibition. The work is installation based, including sound and video pieces. The alternative to this is to go online. I have a high level of experience in this, as I have previously hosted online showcases for my learners via many online exhibition platforms. The other alternative is a short ‘pop up’ exhibition at an outdoor location overlooking Tusker Rock.


21st July ’21

Research – Edgar Holloway

“Edgar Holloway began engraving at the age of fifteen and was one of the last artists to enjoy the final years of success remaining to the great printmakers of the British Etching Revival. Initially self-taught, though encouraged by the great masters of etching, Muirhead Bone and James McBey, Edgar Holloway received his first formal instruction in etching technique from Joseph Webb and later from the Scottish etcher William Wilson. His work is divided into two phases: the first between 1930 and 1947; the second phase beginning in 1969 and lasting to the early years of the 1990’s.

Having abandoned etched portraiture in 1947, after more than a decade of brilliant workmanship, Edgar Holloway was inspired to re-kindle his youthful talents in etching by the prospect of a visit to America at the invitation of Rev. T. Phelan, one of the American patrons of the Guild of St. Joseph and St. Dominic. The Rev. Phelan had visited the Guild at Ditchling in 1970 and was greatly impressed with Edgar Holloway’s etched portraits from the 1930’s. His enthusiasm inspired Edgar Holloway to undertake a new phase of etched portraiture and Holloway received a commission for twelve etched portraits as a direct result of his American trip. Although Edgar Holloway made many highly accomplished topographical prints and fine portraits, he is best known today for the many penetrating and superbly handled self-portrait etchings through which he revealed his own intriguing persona”.

There is a stoic but sad melancholy to Edgar Holloways work. He described himself as ‘alone’, hence the initial requirement to practice his art on himself, and this feeling comes through in his images. Thought, hope, imaginings, wish… all these things are apparent in his work. Above all, these representations of self make me wonder what Holloway is thinking. In particular within the works above, I feel there is something unspoken. It is as though this work is directed at somebody, or as though he is searching for something. This depth of feeling, of connection, is something that I want to come across in the portraits I take for head/space…

Campbell-fine-art.com. 2021. Biography of Edgar Holloway. [online] Available at: <https://www.campbell-fine-art.com/artists.php?id=193&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].


21st July ’21

Research – Ronald Lowe

Ronald Lowe
English 1932 1985
Venture into the Dales
Watercolour

Autumn journey – Brecon (Watercolour) – Ronald Lowe – 1969

Venture into the Dales, E., 2021. Ronald Lowe Venture into the Dales from http://www.bigskyfineart.com. [online] Bigskyfineart.com. Available at: <https://www.bigskyfineart.com/venture-into-the-dales~204&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].


21st July ’21

Email to potential participants for HEAD/SPACE:

H E A D / S P A C E 

I’d like to invite you to be part of my next photographic project. Entitled HEAD/SPACE this project is an investigation into individuals that use a natural landscape for exercise and escape. I aim to photograph people who use a particular natural landscape (possibly their favourite place) for the benefits of both wellbeing and exercise. The project is ultimately about the benefits that are given by a landscape whilst undertaking  exercise pursuits; utilising the natural environment for exercise and wellbeing purposes.

I would like to capture a large format 10×8 colour head and shoulder portrait of you to show you in the environment in which you exercise/escape and an aerial drone photograph to show how small we as humans within the environment. This creates a visual juxtaposition of old (large format film) and new (drone). I aim to also capture some accompanying video footage to further explore your reasons for pursuing activity in a natural landscape.  

I see this project culminating in an exhibition, with large format prints of all participants, lit and suspended from stands, alongside their aerial landscape image. The video piece would be part of the installation and there would also be an accompanying book. 

So, I’m wondering if you are interested in taking part? I wouldn’t need much of your time, and can work around you. Let me know and hope all is well.

Pete.


23rd July ’21

BBC interview

Today my interview for the BBC about ‘Ghost Ships and Tides’ was aired and promoted across BBC news.

The interview appeared across all BBC news platforms, with the lead being taken by BBC Wales News. The piece aired all day across the telly and there was a bigger feature on the Wales Today evening news section. The online feature also featured on the front page of the Main BBC news website, which was amazing!

You can see the web feature here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-wales-57918489

And here is the evening news feature:

It was a great experience being interviewed. I was interviewed by a lovely chap called Matthew Murray. We met on Newton beach, in Porthcawl, and placed Tusker Rock behind us for the interview. I’m quite used to being ‘interviewed’ but this one felt different, as though there was more at stake. I’m really happy with the level of exposure the piece has brought though.


29th July ’21

Following on from a conversation with Spencer Murphy and Tony Clancy in class, we discussed the potential problem with my desired formats within HEAD/SPACE – that being the disparity in scale/quality in 10×8 and drone imagery. Part of the submission for this project would be an exhibition, with the two parts to the project (portrait and landscape) being displayed in large print side by side. The quality difference would be both enormous and apparent. whilst we were talking about this, I had the idea to merge multiple images together to give a greater quality. With the drone, instead of a single image captured from above, I could move closer to the ground, and capture four or more shots of the same scene by manoeuvring the drone around. This would increase the quality once merged by four… I also had the thought of Hockney style joiners. Then, by happenstance, I came upon the work of:

SOHEI NISHINO

These pieces are incredible. Sohei Nishino says of the work:

“Cities are always “amplifying” themselves repeatedly. They emerge and disappear as they continue to integrate themselves. With a camera in hand, I walk through specific cities to take photographs– those of birds’ eye views, of views captured by looking up above me or views from various locations along the road. 

Thereafter, referring to the map, I put together on various canvases all the “fragments” that I have captured, so as to reconstruct my memories to enable myself to render into images the specificity of the respective cities and the appearance of “the present” whose glimpse the cities have given me. By doing so, I try to express again the geographical representations by using the photographs that have captured the specific things and events that are completely different from the symbolic representations on maps. This is my attempt to express the appearance of the cities by integrating my personal experiences and memories. What results is not at all a map to convey precise information, but the record of how I, as a human being, have walked through their streets and how I looked at those streets. Along with being the representation of my awareness, it is that of the appearance of the respective cities as the epitome of their vitality. I try to capture the cities, not necessarily as the entities consisting of the symbolized information and material buildings, but as the fresh and organic Life that is the accumulation of the experiences and activities or the history or memory of the people who live there.

What constitutes the important element of the Series, Diorama in Map, is the constant “movement”. The series is the work that is the deposit of my experiences and the time I have spent in encountering the various phenomena as I move through a certain place. At the same time, by using all my methods of photographing as the elements that constitute a map, I try to actualize in the form of a bird’s-eye-view map, my awareness of the world which spreads out before me, that is, immediately before my eyes. A great many processes are included in the process of producing this work. I can say that each of these processes constitutes a part of my journey through the cities. The reason for that is my belief that photographs are not completed at the moment they are taken, but are completed in the process of recollecting the memories thereafter by confronting them again. I believe that what results from my confronting these enormous number of photographs, and actualizing again in the form of a map by integrating them, is my personal portrait, as well as my representation of the appearance of a specific city whose glimpse it has given me. Moreover, by emphasizing “repetitions” in this series, I try to see the transformation in my personal way of responding to cities and that of my way of communicating them, not to mention the transformations of the cities as structures. I do so by looking at one and the same city at a specific time”.

The image of Hong Kong is a personal favourite:

The visual style is directly related to Hockney, but on an enormous scale. The size of these creations is vast. Sometimes you see something and you immediately connect and that happened with this piece. We see so many images these days via instagram, that it is rare that we (I) look at something and stop. Social media has both enabled us and disabled us in equal measure. But it is worthwhile, for those fleeting moments when something magical passes over the screen of our phone, and we stop scrolling.

The artists gallery (Michael Hoppen) states that “Sohei Nishino was born in Hyogo, Japan in 1982. He graduated from Osaka University of the Arts in 2004, when he began working on his Diorama Map series. Since then he has exhibited his work internationally and gleaned numerous awards including ‘President Award’, Osaka University of Arts (2004), ‘Young Eye Japanese Photographer Association Award’ (2005), ‘Canon New Cosmos Photography Award’ (2005) and the ‘Canon Excellence Award’ (2005).”

By using photography and collage, he creates an alternative view of a city (or place) that both disorientates and binds the viewer in terms of the experience one has when traversing the city streets. By taking predominantly high vantage points, he photographs on 35mm black and white film to create a geographical representation of place through memory and image.

These images have enormous energy. The energy that Sohei Nishino expends whilst making these pieces is transferred directly to the pieces. They bristle with vitality, and I can only imagine what they look like in ‘real life’. There is one on display at the Ashmolean museum in Oxford… https://www.ashmolean.org/tokyo#/&#8230; I might take the kids for a day out.

As for how I could use this… I might try one during the first shoot with my drone. I think I will have to merge several images to achieve the resolution needed to sit next to the 10×8’s, so I might as well have a go at one of these during the experimental stage of HEAD/SPACE. This project in a way circulates around energy, so if I can put some of that energy back into the final pieces, then more the good.

Michael Hoppen Gallery. 2021. Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <https://www.michaelhoppengallery.com/artists/25-sohei-nishino/overview/#/artworks/9577&gt; [Accessed 31 July 2021].

Sohei Nishino. 2021. The JOURNAL by Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <http://soheinishino.net/dioramamap&gt; [Accessed 28 July 2021].


31st July ’21

Ghost ships exhibition

Cyan considerations – don’t want it to look like a table. Might use barrels

https://www.google.com/search?q=barrels&rlz=1C5CHFA_enGB958GB958&oq=barrels&aqs=chrome..69i57j0i433i457i512j46i175i199i512j0i512l5j46i512j0i512.2324j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

And will try both glass and acrylic:

https://www.plasticsheets.com/perspex-acrylic-disc-cut-to-size/?

https://www.vidaxl.co.uk/e/vidaxl-table-top-tempered-glass-round-600-mm/8718475525165.html?gclid=CjwKCAjwo4mIBhBsEiwAKgzXOMs4AD9r7zkODYA6llfx1Zz35uto1XBcAVX-ewrYyV4iD5wTxAMpmRoCThgQAvD_BwE


1st Aug ’21

Paper Negative experiment


2nd Aug ’21

Large format 10×8 experiment


Biblography

Campbell-fine-art.com. 2021. Biography of Edgar Holloway. [online] Available at: <https://www.campbell-fine-art.com/artists.php?id=193&gt; [Accessed 2 August 2021].

Loughrey, C., 2021. The Lighthouse review: A claustrophobic horror filled with sweaty desire, sickly jealousy, and unbridled rage. [online] The Independent. Available at: <https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/lighthouse-review-robert-pattinson-willem-dafoe-trailer-a9143576.html&gt; [Accessed 22 July 2021].

Michael Hoppen Gallery. 2021. Sohei Nishino. [online] Available at: <https://www.michaelhoppengallery.com/artists/25-sohei-nishino/overview/#/artworks/9577&gt; [Accessed 31 July 2021].

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